MINOR LEAGUE NEWS UPDATES

User avatar
BigGuy
Posts: 19902
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 2:40 pm

Re: MINOR LEAGUE NEWS UPDATES

Postby BigGuy » Sat Oct 22, 2016 11:16 am

Under the Radar Yankees Prospects: Abiatal Avelino

by Evan Halpine-Berger@ehalpineberger

Yanks Go Yard is combing through the New York Yankees minor league system in search of hidden gems in this ongoing series. Today, shortstop Abiatal Avelino.

One of the most obvious strengths of the New York Yankees minor league system at the moment is their incredible depth at the shortstop position. They currently have six shortstops ranked in their top 30 prospects according to MLB Pipeline, including two guys who rank #17 and #18 in the site’s top 100 for all of baseball, Gleyber Torres and Jorge Mateo.

With all that talent, it’s easy to overlook the steady progress that 21-year-old Abiatal Avelino has made since signing out of the Dominican Republic all the way back in 2011. Avelino spent the majority of the year playing alongside the much more touted Mateo with the High-A Tampa Yankees, and you could argue that Abiatal had a much more successful season on the whole.

The pair split time pretty evenly between shortstop and second base, and Avelino stood out as a much more polished defender at both positions than the error prone Mateo, who is also 21 years old (which is possibly why the club has tried him out in center field during the Fall Instructional League).

In addition, Avelino put up a .266/.325/.375 (.700 OPS) slash line with 20 steals in 394 plate appearances with Tampa, while Mateo hit .254/.306/.379 (.685 OPS) with 33 steals in 507 PAs. Avelino made more consistent contact and showed a more advanced approach during their time together as a double play combo, which is why he was the one rewarded with the promotion to Double-A Trenton when Torres was acquired from the Cubs at the August 1st trade deadline.

While Avelino has never put together a huge breakout campaign, he’s never also never really had a down year during his five seasons in the Yankees organization. His production has been very consistent year to year, compiling a .269/.335/.358 batting line as a professional.

At 5’11 186lbs, he’s never going to hit for much power, but his speed, contact skills, and plate discipline could be enough to provide value out of the bottom of the order for an MLB club down the line.

Avelino is a plus defender at three infield positions, so at the very least he seems like a solid bet to develop into a quality utility option in the mold of a Ronald Torreyes. If he is going to land an everyday job, it would probably be on the strength of his defense at short. On the other hand, he is not a truly elite glove man, so he’ll need to hit at least a little to justify a full-time gig.

Because he played just 33 games with Double-A Trenton this year, Avelino will probably start 2017 back in the Eastern League. Interestingly, that also seems like the most likely destination for fellow shortstops Gleyber Torres and Jorge Mateo as well.

Will the Yankees move Mateo to center field full time? Could all three rotate around the infield? None of them seems particularly ready to handle Triple-A, so how playing time is divvied up in Trenton will be worth watching.
0 x
"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."

User avatar
BigGuy
Posts: 19902
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 2:40 pm

Re: MINOR LEAGUE NEWS UPDATES

Postby BigGuy » Sat Oct 22, 2016 11:18 am

2016 Yankees Roster Report Card: Justus Sheffield

The pitching prospect in the Andrew Miller deal turned heads in 2016.


by Jake Devin @JakePDevin Oct 22, 2016, 11:00a

Grade: A-

2016 Statistics: 25 GS, 125.1 IP, 3.09 ERA 9.3 SO/9, 3.8 BB/9 (A+/AA)

2017 Roster Status: Double-A/Non-40


Justus Sheffield was one of the pile of prospects shipped in by Brian Cashman at this year's trade deadline. Behind outfielder Clint Frazier, he was the second most significant asset acquired in exchange for weapon of mass destruction reliever Andrew Miller. Consequently, he didn't have much time in the Yankees organization to make a huge impression. Nonetheless, he was very impressive in the handful of starts he made as a Yankees prospect, and his season on the whole was more than enough to spark excitement.

Sheffield is a five-foot-ten left-handed starter who only turned 20 this past May. Most reports cite him sitting around 92-93 with his fastball, with the ability to reach the upper 90’s if needed. He also throws a quality curveball and a functional changeup.

He began 2016 in Lynchburg with Cleveland's High-A affiliate. Sheffield was up to the challenge of facing hitters that were on average three years older than him, posting a 3.59 ERA in 95.1 innings. He did walk 40 batters, but also recorded 93 strikeouts.

After the trade, he was assigned to High-A Tampa, where he continued to thrive. He gave up just six runs across 26 innings, striking out 27 and walking 10. Before the year was out, he was promoted to Double-A Trenton for one final regular season start, in which he struck out nine in four innings without allowing an earned run.

On the whole, his seasonal line ended up being quite strong. His 3.8 BB/9 walk rate was a tad high, but everything else looks excellent for a player that was still a teenager when the season began.

All this was enough to earn Sheffield a bump up in prospect pedigree. Prior to the 2016 season, only Baseball America ranked Sheffield among their top 100 prospects, at 81st. By the time of the trade, he had jumped to 69th on Baseball America's list, and into the top 100 on MLB.com's list. As of now, MLB.com has Sheffield ranked as the number six prospect in what is a loaded Yankee farm system.

Given Sheffield's plus velocity, undersized frame, and less than stellar control (thus far), there will surely be some who believe his future is in the bullpen. While that is certainly possible, he showed plenty of promise as a starter this season, pitching very effectively against much older competition. In all likelihood, he will begin next year with Double-A Trenton. It wasn't easy to part with a star like Miller, who has burned the American League playoffs to the ground, but it will have been worth it if prospects like Sheffield continue to develop like this.
0 x
"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."

User avatar
BigGuy
Posts: 19902
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 2:40 pm

Re: MINOR LEAGUE NEWS UPDATES

Postby BigGuy » Sun Oct 23, 2016 8:09 am

Under the Radar Yankees Prospects: Reliever Brody Koerner

by Evan Halpine-Berger7 minutes agoFollow @ehalpineberger

Yanks Go Yard is combing through the New York Yankees minor league system in search of hidden gems in this ongoing series. Today, reliever Brody Koerner.

The New York Yankees strategy of turning dominant college relievers into starting pitchers paid off in a big way this season with 2015 fifth rounder Chance Adams becoming one of the most successful starters in the upper minors this year and vaulting all the way up to number 13 on MLB Pipeline’s list of top 30 prospects.

23-year-old righty Brody Koerner was in the midst of a similar transition this year, before an elbow injury in May ended his season. The experiment was going very well before Koerner was shut down. He allowed just seven earned runs in 34 IP while striking out 29 and walking five during his first five professional starts split between Low-A Charleston and High-A Tampa.

Like Adams, Koerner is a member of the 2015 draft class, although he wasn’t selected until 17th overall because of a rough NCAA career where he compiled a 6.98 ERA in 98 IP over three seasons with Clemson, but the Yankees liked his arsenal enough to take a late-round flier on him.

Koerner rewarded New York’s faith in him with an excellent 2015 showing, pitching to a 1.23 ERA in 29.1 IP between Pulaski and Charleston. His most notable skill is his ability to keep the ball on the ground and in the yard with a heavy low-90’s sinker that he pairs with a solid curveball.

New York’s decision makers like Koerner enough to give him one of their valuable spots on the Scottsdale Scorpions in the Arizona Fall League to help replace some of the innings he missed out on this season. Presumably they still want him to work as a starter going forward, so the most important thing for him this month is to get in as much work as possible to keep his innings limit progressing in the right direction.
Want your voice heard? Join the Yanks Go Yard team!Write for us!
Things have been pretty ugly for Koerner in the early days of the AFL. Over his first two outings, he allowed nine earned runs and four walks in 3.1 innings of work. The advanced competition was already going to be a challenge since Koerner has never pitched above A-Ball, but there is likely some rust and lingering effects of the injury affecting his performance as well.

Not every pitcher is going to be James Kaprielian, who can miss the entire regular season and return without missing a step. While you’d like to see Koerner turn it around over the next month, the most important thing is that he stays healthy and is ready to try starting full time again in 2017. He may not have Adams’s stuff, but he could emerge as a legitimate starting pitcher prospect next year.
0 x
"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."

User avatar
BigGuy
Posts: 19902
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 2:40 pm

Re: MINOR LEAGUE NEWS UPDATES

Postby BigGuy » Sun Oct 23, 2016 11:37 am

2016 Yankees Roster Report Card: Dillon Tate

The Yankees acquired this former first-round pick at the deadline after he struggled in the first half of the season.

by Caitlin Rogers Oct 23, 2016, 11:00a

Image
Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images

Grade: D

2016 Statistics: 24 G, 4.70 ERA, 7.7 K/9, 3.6 BB/9, 82.1 IP

2016 Level/Roster Status: Low-A/Non-40


After playing fairly mediocre baseball for the first half of the season, the Yankees decided to sell at the deadline for the first time in years. Rather than keep Carlos Beltran for the remaining few months of his contract, the Yankees traded him to the Rangers in exchange for Dillon Tate, along with fellow pitchers Erik Swanson, and Nick Green.

Tate was drafted by the Rangers in the first round of the 2015 MLB Draft out of UC Santa Barbara. He tossed just nine innings in the Rangers’ farm system in 2015, and gave up three hits while striking out nine. Tate started his 2016 season with the Rangers’ Low-A affiliate, and did not perform as expected. When he was drafted, Tate’s fastball was consistently clocked between 92-96 MPH, sometimes even touching 100. After the first few weeks of the season, Tate was sidelined with a hamstring injury and ended up missing nearly a month of action. After he returned, his fastball speed reportedly dropped quite a bit, and sometimes he was only throwing in the upper-80s.

If Tate’s velocity dipped because of his injury, then the Yankees may have gotten a steal. Through 65 innings in the Rangers’ system this season, Tate had a 5.12 ERA and 4.37 FIP. The good news is that he did show some improvement during his short time in the Yankees’ system. The Yankees sent him to Low-A Charleston where he pitched exclusively out of the bullpen, despite the fact that he spent nearly all of his time with the Rangers working as a starting pitcher. Tate posted a 3.12 ERA through 17 and one-third innings in Charleston, where his home run and walk rates came down slightly.

Tate ended up being yet another player that the Yankees sent to participate in the Arizona Fall League. During his debut a few days ago, Tate’s velocity was reportedly up to 97 MPH and sat between 94-96. He has only pitched three innings so far, but he has struck out four batters, given up five hits (including two home runs), and surrendered four earned runs. It is certainly an encouraging sign to see that his velocity appears to be bouncing back. For his part, Tate has primarily blamed his struggles in the Rangers’ system this season on mechanical issues.

For now, Tate will be in the AFL working on changing up his repertoire more frequently, and using all of his pitches to get batters out. By the time the AFL finishes up in mid-November, Tate should have a lot more innings under his belt, and we should have a better sense of where he stands. He could start the 2017 season back in Low-A, or he could even find his way to Tampa. Considering his struggles this year, it is unlikely that Tate will reach the majors in 2017.
0 x
"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."

User avatar
Zoo Keeper
Site Admin
Posts: 171
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2016 11:38 pm
Contact:

Re: MINOR LEAGUE NEWS UPDATES

Postby Zoo Keeper » Tue Oct 25, 2016 1:04 am

Under the Radar Yankees Prospects: Rashad Crawford

by Evan Halpine-Berger @ehalpineberger

Yanks Go Yard is combing through the New York Yankees minor league system in search of hidden gems in this ongoing series. Today, outfielder Rashad Crawford.

While outfielder Rashad Crawford was largely seen as a throw-in as the fourth piece in the trade that sent Aroldis Chapman to the Chicago Cubs at the trade deadline, the toolsy 23-year-old opened some eyes in his new organization down the stretch for the High-A Tampa Yankees.

There is no denying that the real prizes of that trade were potential superstars Gleyber Torres and Billy McKinney, but in Crawford, the Yankees may have landed a third player who has the potential to become a legitimate prospect.

Crawford hit .291/.381/.364 in 127 plate appearances in the Florida State League after coming over to the Yankees. He finished the year with a .264/.341/.380 slash line with 26 steals in 33 attempts (78.8% success rate) in 497 plate appearances, all in High-A.

Most impressively, Crawford took major steps forward with his plate discipline. He cut down his strikeout rate from 26% the previous year to 20.1% this season. At the same time, he nearly doubled his walk rate from 5.1% in 2015 to 9.7% in 2016.

Tampa Yankees manager Patrick Osborn sounded impressed with his newest player after the deadline, telling Randy Miller of NJ Advance Media:

I was told that it was a great job by our scouts to get him involved in this trade. He was a basketball player in high school who didn’t play baseball full-time until he got drafted…He’s a plus-plus runner, plays a really good center field and he’s got a nice looking swing. He’s a kid who wasn’t a high pick, but he has a really high ceiling. His potential really hasn’t been tapped into yet.
Crawford’s late start to the game explains why he’s still rough around the edges for 23, but his athleticism makes him a potential late bloomer. His plus speed gives him a real advantage on both sides of that ball. His stolen base totals have increased steadily each of the past five years (4, 10, 14, 20, 26). He’s also a ball hawk in center field. There are few balls he can’t get to with those wheels.

At the very least, Crawford seems like a good bet to surface as a useful bench option after another year or two of seasoning in the upper-minors. He’s probably in line to start next year with Double-A Trenton, although the expected glut of outfielders in Triple-A could make advancing beyond that any time soon a difficult proposition.
0 x

User avatar
Zoo Keeper
Site Admin
Posts: 171
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2016 11:38 pm
Contact:

Re: MINOR LEAGUE NEWS UPDATES

Postby Zoo Keeper » Tue Oct 25, 2016 1:04 am

2016 Yankees Roster Report Card: Gleyber Torres

The Yankees added another promising shortstop prospect to their system this season

by Jason Cohen @Jason00Cohen Oct 24, 2016, 11:00a

Image
Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports

Grade: A

2016 Statistics: 125 G, 547 PA, .270/.354/.421, 11 HR, 21 SB, 110 K/58 BB

2017 Roster Status: Double-A/Non-40


This year the Yankees went big on prospect acquisitions, adding several promising players to their farm system in exchange for a collection of veteran talent. In the trade that sent Aroldis Chapman to the Cubs, the Yankees received shortstop Gleyber Torres. Despite just a small amount of time spent with his new organization, it’s clear that the 19-year-old shortstop is now one of the team’s best prospects.

2016 was just his third year in professional baseball, and at the time of the deal, Torres had put together his best season yet. He hit .275/.359/.433 in 94 games, and saw a big jump in his power numbers, achieving career highs in home runs and doubles by the month of August. His numbers dipped a bit after making the move to Tampa, but we shouldn’t be too worried about that. His quick right-handed swing has helped him develop an all-fields approach, and he should see more power as he learns to pull the ball to his advantage.

Torres is noted for having a very mature approach at the plate, which has helped his walk rate and on base skills throughout his career. We saw good signs in 2016 as he improved his walk rate from the previous year. In 2015, he walked an underwhelming 8.4% of the time, but in 2016 that number jumped to 10.3% with the Cubs, and then 11.6% with the Yankees. He has plenty of time, but if he can then limit his strikeout rate to below 21%, things will look really good for him going forward.

Some found it curious that the Yankees would even add another shortstop prospect when they already have Jorge Mateo. However, this should not be thought of as an issue because it’s a great idea to accumulate as much talent as possible and allow things to shake out down the line. As impressive as Mateo might be, it’s important to remember that Torres has been the more highly regarded player so far, ranking as high as the No. 28 prospect in baseball. He also spent the year in High-A at the age of 19, while Mateo was at the same level at 21.

The one thing Mateo might have over Torres is defensive capabilities. While Mateo is generally considered a future middle infielder, Torres’ position is a little more questionable. He has average range, but makes up for it with great instincts and a strong arm. Torres will certainly stay at the position long term, though he will likely spend some time at second base in order to accommodate Mateo. If Torres ultimately changes positions, he is projected to profile strongly as either a second baseman or third baseman, thanks to his strong bat.

Torres is currently beating up pitching in the Arizona Fall League, which is an excellent way to close out a promising first season in the Yankees farm system. Because of the graduation of Gary Sanchez and Aaron Judge, Torres is now the team’s No. 2 prospect. Steady development should produce a reliable staple in the Yankees’ lineup for years to come.
0 x

User avatar
Zoo Keeper
Site Admin
Posts: 171
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2016 11:38 pm
Contact:

Re: MINOR LEAGUE NEWS UPDATES

Postby Zoo Keeper » Tue Oct 25, 2016 1:05 am

All posts from Admin in this section are reposts of BigGuy's that were not transferred over from the old server.
0 x

User avatar
BigGuy
Posts: 19902
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 2:40 pm

Re: MINOR LEAGUE NEWS UPDATES

Postby BigGuy » Tue Oct 25, 2016 11:08 am

2016 Yankees Roster Report Card: Luis Torrens

After missing all of 2015, the twenty-year-old catcher returned in 2016 as a top Yankees prospect


by Alec Gilfillan @adgilfillan Oct 25, 2016, 11:00a

Grade: B

2016 Statistics: 52 G, 214 PA, .250/.350/.337, 2 HR, 33 K, 26 BB, threw out 39% of base stealers

2017 Roster Status: Single-A/Non-40


Luis Torrens was born during Derek Jeter’s rookie season. 16 years later, the Yankees signed Torrens out of Venezuela (where he was born) and converted him into a catcher. In 2013, as a 17 year old, he played in rookie ball, showing off good defense and a strong arm. Torrens only slugged .299 that year, but it was still enough to raise his profile in the organization.

Torrens spent most of 2014 playing for the Staten Island Yankees, where he was approximately three years younger than his competition. In 202 plate appearances there, he hit .270/.327/.405. Torrens continued to show off a strong arm, throwing out 42% of potential base stealers that season. His defense, combined with his offensive potential, put Torrens on the Yankees’ radar as a potential future star.

2015 was supposed to be the next big step in Torrens’ development but it wasn’t meant to be. He had shoulder surgery in the offseason and missed the entire year. Although it was a disappointment, Torrens was only 19 years old, and had years left to get healthy and develop, so the Yankees weren’t worried about his injury long term at that point.

In 2016, Torrens finally returned to game action. In 12 games at Staten Island, he hit a blistering .311/.360/.400 before moving up to Charleston where he .230/.348/.317. By August, Torrens had performed well enough that Pinstripe Alley ranked him 13th in the Yankees organization. MLB had this to say about him in their prospect list:

An advanced hitter for his age, Torrens already shows a willingness to work counts and use the entire field. He used his downtime last year to add strength and get in better shape, so he may begin to realize his 15-homer potential from the right side of the plate.

While he can't match Gary Sanchez's lofty offensive ceiling, Torrens is better behind the plate. He already had a plus arm when he signed and quickly learned the footwork and transfer he needed as a catcher, enabling him to erase 41 percent of base stealers in his first two pro seasons.

It was a short season for Torrens but the important thing is that the 20-year-old catcher is fully recovered from his injury and is ready to show the Yankees what he can do. Torrens will most likely start 2017 at Low-A. The Yankees haven’t been hesitant to challenge their young prospects lately though, so it might not be long before he’s in Double-A. Even if his bat never fully develops, a strong defensive catcher is always a valuable asset.
0 x
"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."

User avatar
BigGuy
Posts: 19902
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 2:40 pm

Re: MINOR LEAGUE NEWS UPDATES

Postby BigGuy » Wed Oct 26, 2016 9:49 am

Under the Radar Yankees Prospects: Thairo Estrada

by Evan Halpine-Berger @ehalpineberger

Yanks Go Yard is combing through the New York Yankees minor league system in search of hidden gems in this ongoing series. Today, shortstop Thairo Estrada.

One of the players most hurt by the New York Yankees enormous collection of top shortstop prospects is 20-year-old Thairo Estrada, who has more or less fallen off the radar of more fans and analysts despite another strong season in 2016.

In his first taste of full-season ball, Estrada hit .290/.346/.391 with eight home runs and 18 steals in 118 games (499 PA) for the Low-A Charleston Riverdogs and High-A Tampa Yankees. He faltered slightly at first upon his promotion to the Florida State League, but finished the year strong despite being almost three years younger than his average competition.

Estrada has found success at every stop of his young career despite consistently playing against guys 2-3 years his senior. He signed for a relatively modest $49,000 bonus out of Venezuela in 2012, and spent the next three seasons quietly putting up solid numbers in the GCL and NY-Penn League before making the leap to full-season A this year.

Ranked number 28 on MLB Pipeline’s list of top 30 Yankees prospects entering 2016, Estrada was pushed out of the rankings through no fault of his own when the team acquired five of their current top 15 prospects at the August 1st trade deadline.

Despite being a natural shortstop, Estrada didn’t receive much time at the position this year because he was playing alongside elite names like Jorge Mateo, Gleyber Torres, Kyle Holder, and Hoy Jun Park. He split his time pretty evenly between second and third base this year, with only occasional cameos at short.

That’s a shame because Estrada has an outside shot at developing into an OK everyday big league shortstop if given the opportunity. He has a cannon arm, good range, and quick hands. Estrada’s lack of power is the real knock against him. He did show surprising pop at times this year from his 5’10 155 lb frame, and at 20, he still might have some filling out to do.

Estrada is your typical scrappy shortstop at the plate. He makes a ton of contact, has plus plate discipline, and is an above-average runner who should steal 20 bags consistently. I could definitely see him developing into a weapon in the bottom of some team’s order at some point.
0 x
"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."

User avatar
BigGuy
Posts: 19902
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2016 2:40 pm

Re: MINOR LEAGUE NEWS UPDATES

Postby BigGuy » Wed Oct 26, 2016 2:15 pm

2016 Yankees Roster Report Card: Tyler Wade

After struggling mightily in a taste of Double-A last season, how has Tyler Wade fared in 2016?

by Ben Diamond@_BenDiamond Oct 26, 2016

Image
Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports

Grade: B

2016 Statistics: 133 G, 583 PA, .259/.353/.349, 5 HR, 27 SB, 11.3 BB%, 17.7% K%

2017 Roster Status: Double-A/Non-40


Over the past year or so, and likely for the next year or so, you’re probably going to hear the words ‘under-the-radar,’ ‘sleeper,’ and ‘breakout’ associated with Tyler Wade. But, I’m here to tell you he’s none of these things. This isn’t a knock on Wade, either, as you’ll see in a moment. The 21-year old is a very solid prospect by all accounts, and Wade carries an exciting profile that Yankees fans should be thrilled to have in the farm system. That said, calling him a breakout prospect would simply be wrong.

Instead, it makes more sense to associate Wade with a less catchy, but more accurate phrase: underrated, with unspectacular minor league numbers that won’t land him on top prospect lists, but a set of tools that should allow him to be a productive big league starter. That just about covers what you need to know about Wade, but let’s dive into some of the details on the 2013 fourth round pick.

Wade had a true breakout season in 2014, as a 19-year-old in his first taste of full season ball. The lefty hit .272/.350/.349 with a home run and 22 stolen bases over 129 games, launching himself into ‘actual prospect’ status for the Yankees. He continued his excellent play in 2015 at High-A—despite being young for the level, Wade easily handled the opposition to the tune of a .280/.349/.353 line and 31 stolen bases. He was given a cup of coffee at Double-A, which is where the success finally stopped. Normally a player with very good plate discipline, Wade walked just twice in 117 plate appearances (1.7% walk rate) while hitting .204.

Luckily, Wade bounced back this season in a big way, walking 11.3% of the time while hitting .259/.353/.349 with five home runs and 27 stolen bases. He also drove in 27 runs while scoring 90 times, which is interesting, if not completely meaningless. Although the final slash line was nothing eye-popping—which is why you probably won’t see Wade ranked on top-100 prospect lists anytime soon—context is important. Wade is just 21, more than three years younger than the average Double-A player, and is a speedy lefty hitting shortstop. He doesn’t need to be a force in the middle of a lineup to be a big league starter.

I may have lied about one thing, though…Wade isn’t necessarily a shortstop. While many scouts agree that he has the tools and makeup to play solid defense at the six-spot at the highest level, you may have noticed that the Yankees’ system isn’t exactly lacking in shortstop prospects. As Wade has shot through the system, he has passed other shortstops, including Abiatal Avelino and Jorge Mateo, and has spent time at second base in order to accommodate everyone. With the addition of Gleyber Torres, versatility will be key for Wade to make it through the system.

Despite spending the majority of his time last year at shortstop (91 games there compared to 38 at second base), Wade has played centerfield exclusively during his time in the Arizona Fall League. This isn’t to say that he’s now an outfielder, but instead, he might just have another notch in his belt with the ability to play the outfield, along with second base and shortstop. In a best case scenario, this could speed Wade’s promotion to the big leagues, since the team lacks a (young) true centerfielder. He could also serve in a valuable role as a super utility player.

Of course, I should mention that Tyler Wade has a lower batting average and slugging percentage than Tim Tebow in the AFL. But, he reportedly looks spent after a full season in the minor leagues and performances in the AFL have little weight unless you really want them to (see: Gary Sanchez in 2015, Greg Bird in 2014).

It’s prudent to ignore the offensive numbers on offense, though, and just focus on the whole package we’re now seeing with Wade. He’s a versatile player who could play three positions up the middle while contributing league average offense (a solid average and on base percentage, albeit with little power) and excellent baserunning skills. Toss in makeup that Yankees’ officials continually rave about and a solid track record of success, and you’re looking at an average big league starter, with a high floor as an extremely useful utility man. The numbers might not stand out, but Wade could soon emerge as a sneakily productive big league player.
0 x
"Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."


Return to “Yankees Farm System”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests

cron